Those With Panic or Anxiety Attacks

HELPING FRIENDS AND FAMILY UNDERSTAND WHAT THOSE WITH PANIC or Anxiety ATTACKS EXPERIENCES

These are some of the universal thoughts, ideas, and behaviors that many share.

I experience symptoms in my body that are so extreme that I conclude I must be having a major physical malfunction.

I experience fear that I find I am not able to control.

For no apparent reason, I will suddenly feel my heart racing, find it hard to breathe, feel my chest tightening, feel tingling through my body, feel lightheaded, dizzy, and like I’m going to pass out. I often experience heart palpitations.

I find it impossible to have fun like I once was able to.

There are certain places that I consistently find uncomfortable.

I find that, because of fear:

  • I may change my activities,
  • may not want to leave my house,
  • I may pull back from what I once enjoyed.

BECAUSE:

You find yourself always nervous and tense because you live in fear of experiencing another panic or anxiety attack.

Many times, you feel so bad that you are tempted to be taken to the emergency room because you are convinced something is terribly wrong.

BEHAVIORAL REACTIONS THAT YOU MAY COME UP AGAINST

You have established places and situations you avoid because your association with those places and situations brings about fear and discomfort.

Your number of safe places continues to dwindle.

Your mind is tired. You often wake up fatigued, and as the day goes on, you often feel the need for a nap.

When you experience an unusual symptom in your body, you tend to fixate on that symptom.

Trips are no longer fun like they used to be. They now require so much preparation and planning that the work and the stress seem to outweigh the anticipated enjoyment.

You find yourself extremely uncomfortable when you are in a facility with many people, especially if it is crowded.

When you are in a strange or crowded place, you always seek out and stay close to the exit.

Even on a short trip like an errand, you often find yourself taking along bottles of water and other supplies you anticipate you “may” need.

Sometimes when in a crowded restaurant, you find it hard to eat.

You prefer situations where you can keep your options open. You do not necessarily prefer to drive, but on the same hand, you don’t feel comfortable being trapped in another person’s vehicle without a way of escape.

If you are in a large grocery store, or any kind of store, you begin to get more and more uncomfortable the further away you get from the exit.

You find fewer and fewer situations that you look forward to.

Brian Ludwig

Check out Calming The Storm By Brian Ludwig

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